HDVision System

Potter Eye Care now features the “HDVision System

Included with your vision exam, a digital eye exam using the all-new Marco TRS-5100 and OPD-Scan III, the latest in eye care technology.

 

This new technology creates a precise map of your eyes enabling Dr. Potter to see five times more optical details,

ensuring you’ll be able to see your very best!

 

Eyewear and Contact Lenses – More Precise Prescriptions

•              No more guessing which is best – 1 or 2?  The HDVision System does most of the work for you as it begins by automatically selecting the correct prescription starting point, which means you won’t be asked as many questions or need to make so many decisions during the exam.

 

•              Using the HDVision System, powered by the Marco TRS-5100, Dr. Potter will provide a prescription that is extremely precise and can be personalized for lifestyle and different lighting conditions, for patients who wear glasses and contact lenses, in less time than a traditional exam.

 

The Health of Your Eyes & Unique Visual Needs

•              Sometimes vision is blurry for reasons that cannot be corrected with traditional glasses or contacts; things other than “nearsightedness” or “farsightedness.”  Difficulties driving at night due to experiencing glare, seeing halos, blurry vision and double vision are all higher-order aberrations, and can be identified during the exam using the new HDVision System.

 

•              Dr. Potter will examine the results of your exam and will show you the results obtained by the HDVision System so that you will understand your own unique visual needs.

 

•              Dr. Potter is extremely concerned about the health of your eyes, far beyond what your prescription is right now. The HDVision System, using the Marco TRS-5100 and OPD-Scan III makes it easier to spot conditions like diabetes, glaucoma, macular degeneration and cataracts, even high cholesterol and blood pressure, earlier, giving Dr. Potter a head-start in treatment to preserve your sight.

 

Call Potter Eye Care today at (256) 353-2392

to schedule your exam with the HDVision System! 

 

 HD Vision

The eye holds a unique place in medicine. Your eye doctor can see almost every part of your eye from an exterior view. Other than your skin, almost every other part of your body cannot be fully examined without either entering the body (with a scope) or scanning your body with an imaging device (such as a CAT scan, MRI or ultrasound).

This gives your eye doctor the ability to determine most eye problems just by looking in your eye. Even though that makes diagnosing most problems more straightforward than in other medical specialties, there are still many things you can do to get the most out of your eye exams. Here are the top 7 things you can do to get as much as possible out of your exam.

1) Bring your corrective eyewear with you. Have glasses? Bring them. Have separate pairs for distance and reading? Bring them both. Have contacts? Bring them with you and not just the lenses themselves but the lenses prescription, which is on the box they came in. What we most want to know is the brand, the base curve (BC) and the prescription. If you have both contacts and glasses bring BOTH.

2) Know your family history of eye diseases. There are several eye diseases that run in families. The big ones are Glaucoma, Macular Degeneration and Retinal Detachments.  If you have a family history of one of these, it may change a doctor’s recommendations for intervention compared to someone without a family history.

3) Know your medical problems. There are several medical problems that correlate with certain diseases of the eye. Diabetes, hypertension, thyroid disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and autoimmune diseases all correlate with particular eye problems.    Knowing your medical history greatly increases the likelihood of more accurately dealing with your eye problem.

4) Know your medications. Several medications are known to produce specific eye problems. Drugs like steroids, Plaquenil, Gleevac, amiodarone, fingolamide, diuretics and Topamax, to name a few, can create problems in your eye. Knowing you are on certain medications may make it much easier for the doctor to arrive at a diagnosis of your eye condition.

5) Be calm and do your best. There are several tests we do that require your participation. The two tests that make people most anxious are the refraction (test to determine glasses or contacts prescriptions) and a visual field test (tests your peripheral vision most commonly for glaucoma). With both of these tests just stay calm and give your best answers. There are no perfect answers. You are not going to get shocked for a wrong answer so don’t ramp up the anxiety; just give it your best try.

6) Bring someone with you when possible. There are two reasons for this. One is that it is better not to drive home if you are having your eyes dilated. Many people can do it comfortably, but some can’t. If you are not sure you can drive comfortably with your eyes dilated it is better to have someone with you who can drive home. The second reason is that is always better to have a second pair of ears to hear what the doctor is telling you - especially if the problem is significant. There are many studies that show a person often mishears or misremembers what they have been told, especially if they are anxious. Two pairs of ears are better than one.

7) Write down any questions. It’s very easy to forget to ask something you really wanted to know. You will get your questions answered much better if you have written them down prior to your appointment.

Follow these tips and you will have your best experience possible at your next exam.

Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology has recommendations for how often adults need to get their eyes examined and those recommendations vary according to the level of risk you have for eye disease.

For people who are not at elevated risk the recommendations are:

  • Baseline eye exam at age 40.
  • Ages 40-54 every 2-4 years.
  • Ages 55-64 every 1-3 years.
  • Ages 65 and older every 1-2 years.

Those recommendations are just for people who have NO added risk factors. If you are diabetic or have a family history of certain eye diseases then you need exams more frequently.  

As you can see, the guidelines recommend more frequent exams as you get older. Here are the Top 4 reasons why you need your eyes examined more frequently as you get older:

1. Glaucoma

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the United States. It has no symptoms when it begins and the only way to detect glaucoma is through a thorough eye exam. Glaucoma gets more and more common as you get older. Your risk of glaucoma is less then 1% if you are under 50 and over 10% if you are 80 or over. The rates are higher for African Americans. Glaucoma can be treated but not cured.  The earlier it is detected and treated, the better your chances are of keeping your vision.

2. Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in the U.S. Like glaucoma, it gets more common as you age. It affects less than 2% of people under 70, rises to 10% in your 80s and can get as high as 50% in people in their 90s. The rates are highest in Caucasians. Macular degeneration can also be treated but not cured. Early intervention leads to better outcomes.

3. Cataracts

As in the cases above, cataracts get more common as you get older.  If you live long enough, almost everyone will develop some degree of cataracts. In most people cataracts develop slowly over many years and people may not recognize that their vision has changed. If your vision is slowly declining from cataracts and you are not aware of that change it can lead to you having more difficulty in performing life’s tasks. We get especially concerned about driving since statistics show that you are much more likely to get in a serious car accident if your vision is reduced. There is also evidence that people with reduced vision from cataracts have a higher rate of hip fractures from falls.

4. Dry Eyes

Dry eyes can affect anyone at any age but the incidence tends to be at its highest in post-menopausal women. Dry eyes can present with some fairly annoying symptoms (foreign body sensation in the eye, burning, intermittent blurriness). Sometimes there aren’t any symptoms but on exam we can see the surface of the cornea drying out.  Dry eye can lead to significant corneal problems and visual loss if it gets severe and is left untreated.

One of the most heart-breaking things we see in the office is the 75-year-old new patient who hasn’t had an eye exam in 10 years and comes in because his vision “just isn’t right” and his family has noticed he sometimes bumps into things. On exam his eye pressures are through the roof and he is nearly blind from undetected glaucoma. And at that point there is no getting back the vision he has lost. If he had only come in several years earlier and just followed the guidelines, all this could have been prevented. Now he is going to have to live out the rest of his years struggling with severe vision loss.

DON’T LET THAT BE YOU!!!!!!

Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D.

One of the most commonly asked questions in an eye exam comes right after the refraction, or glasses prescription check: “What is my vision?”

Almost invariably, people know the term “20/20”. In fact, it’s a measure of pride for many people. “My doctor says I have 20/20 vision.” Or, on the other side of that same coin, having vision that is less than 20/20, say 20/400, can be a cause of great concern and anxiety. In this discussion I will describe what these terms actually mean.

To lay the foundation, let’s discuss some common terms. Visual acuity (VA) is clarity or sharpness of vision. Vision can be measured both corrected (with glasses or contact lenses) and uncorrected (without glasses or contact lenses) during the course of an eye exam. The result of an eye exam boils down to two different but related sets of numbers: your VA and your actual glasses prescription.

The notation that doctors use to measure VA is based off of a 20-foot distance. This is where the first 20 in 20/20 comes from. In Europe, since they use the metric system, it is based on meters. The 20/20 equivalent is 6/6 because they use a 6-meter test distance. The second number is the smallest line of letters that a patient can read. In other words, 20/20 vision means that at a 20-foot test distance, the person can read the 20/20 line of letters.

The technical definition of 20/20 is full of scientific jargon - concepts such as minutes of Arc, subtended angles, and optotype size. If you’d like to read more of the technical details there is a well-written article with illustrations by Dr. John Ellman, you can find here.  For the purposes of our discussion here I’ll try to explain it in less technical terms.

“Normal” vision is somewhat arbitrarily set as 20/20 (some people can see better than that). Let’s say you have two people: Person A with 20/20 vision and Person B with 20/40 vision. The smallest line of letters that person B can see at 20 feet is the 20/40 line.  Person A, with “normal” 20/20 vision, could stand 40 feet away from that same line and see it. There is somewhat of a linear relationship in that the 20/40 letters are twice the size of the 20/20 letters and someone with normal vision could see a 20/40 letter at twice the distance as the person with 20/40 vision.

So how does this translate to a glasses prescription?

Eye doctors can often estimate what your uncorrected VA will be based on your glasses prescription. This works mainly for near-sightedness. Essentially, every quarter step of increasing glasses prescription (i.e. -1.25 as compared to -1.50) means a person can see one less line on a VA chart.

A prescription of - 1.25 works out to roughly 20/50 vision, -1.50 to 20/60 and so on. Anybody with an anatomically sound eyeball, meaning the absence of any kind of disease process, should generally be correctable to 20/20 with glasses or contact lenses. It is important to note, however, that rarely a person’s best corrected VA may be less than 20/20 with no noticeable signs of disease.

Far-sightedness is more difficult to estimate because it is affected by a number of other factors, including one’s age and focusing ability. But that’s a topic for another article.

So there you have it! Hopefully this has shed some light on what these measurements that we take actually mean, and it has allowed you to understand your eye health a little bit better.

Article contributed by Dr. Jonathan Gerard

As an eye doctor, diagnosing a red eye can be challenging. Are we dealing with an infection, allergy, inflammation or dryness?

One of the most common questions I get is, “Doc, my eyes are red, burning, itchy, and tearing. Is this dry eye or from allergies?” The short answer is it could be one, both or neither. I’ll outline various ways these conditions present clinically and the treatments for them.

The hallmark symptom of allergy – meaning if you have this symptom you almost definitely have the condition – is itching. Red, watery, ITCHY eyes are almost invariably due to an allergen, whether environmental or medicinal. It is one of the most common ocular conditions we, as eye doctors, treat - especially when plants are filling the air with pollen as they bloom in the spring and then die off in the fall.

The itching occurs because an immune cell called a Mast cell releases histamine, causing the itching sensation. It can be quite unbearable for the sufferer, causing them to rub their eyes constantly, which unbeknownst to them, actually increases the amount of histamine in the eye, leading to worsening of the symptoms.

Treatments may include:

  • Over-the-counter or prescription allergy drops (mostly anti-histamines or mast cell stabilizers).
  • Topical steroids (to get the inflammation under control).
  • Cool compresses applied to the eye.

Patients sometimes need to take drops every day to keep their symptoms under control.

Dry eye can have many of the same symptoms as allergic eye disease, with the eye being red and possibly watery (‘My eyes are tearing how could it be dry eyes?’). The main exceptions are that people with dry eyes tend to complain more of burning and a foreign body sensation - like there is sand or gravel in the eye - rather than itchiness.

Dry eye is a multi-faceted disease with many different causes and treatments. Treatment ranges from simple re-wetting eye drops to long-term medications (both topical and oral), as well as non-medicinal treatments such as eyelid heating treatment.

So how do we determine the difference? The first question I ask patients who complain of red, watery, uncomfortable eyes is, “What is your MAIN symptom? Itching or burning?” The answer will likely direct which course of treatment we take, and as those treatments sometimes overlap, you may have a component of both dry eye and allergy.

That is important to distinguish because many of the treatments we use for allergies - like antihistamine eye drops - can sometimes make the dryness worse. Though neither of these conditions is 100% curable (except maybe for allergy, where if you remove the allergen, you obviously won’t get symptoms!). We have many tools in our treatment arsenal to keep the symptoms at bay.

Unfortunately, dry eye and allergy aren’t the only two things that can cause your eye to have the multiple symptoms of red, watery, itchy, burning eyes. There are other problems, such as Blepharitis, that can produce a similar appearance, as well as bacterial and viral infections.

So before embarking on a particular therapy, it is wise to have a good exam to help you get on the right track of improving your symptoms.

Article contributed by Dr. Jonathan Gerard

A recent study published in JAMA Ophthalmology has demonstrated in older women a correlation between having cataract surgery and a decrease in death rate from all causes.

The data comes from a prospective longitudinal study called the Women’s Health Initiative. This study involved women 65 years or older and collected data from Jan. 1, 1993, until Dec. 31, 2015.

In the study, there were 74,044 women who had been identified with a cataract and within that group 41,735 had undergone cataract surgery during the study time period.

The results showed that of those in the group who had cataract surgery, the mortality - or death - rate was 1.52 deaths per 100 person years. That means that in any given year if you took 100 women who had cataract surgery about 1.52 died in that year. The mortality rate in the women who did not have cataract surgery was 2.56 deaths per 100 person years. Those numbers mean that women who had cataract surgery were 40% LESS LIKELY to die in any given year than women who did not have surgery.

An important aspect of this study is that the authors accounted for several reasons that might have increased the death rate in the non-cataract surgery group. They adjusted for issues such as smoking, alcohol use, Body Mass Index (a measure of a degree of excess weight), and physical activity. Controlling for those factors means that the higher death rate in the women who did not have cataract surgery cannot be explained or blamed on them having a higher rate of smoking, alcohol use, being overweight or being less physically active.

Although the authors excluded any of those above factors for the mortality difference they did not have any specific reasons as to why this difference exists. There just may be some inherent reason why having better vision leads to a healthier existence and therefore a lower risk of death.

 

Why are these results important? They demonstrate that there may be an additional benefit to having cataract surgery besides the improved vision (which is enough of a benefit on its own) as it may also help you to live a longer more enjoyable life.

 

Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D.

This blog provides general information and discussion about eye health and related subjects. The words and other content provided on this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately licensed physician. The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

1. Vision is so important to humans that almost half of your brain’s capacity is dedicated to visual perception.

2. The most active muscles in your body are the muscles that move your eyes.

3. The surface tissue of your cornea (the epithelium) is one of the quickest-healing tissues in your body. The entire corneal surface can turn over every 7 days.

4. Your eyes can get sunburned. It is called photokeratitis and it can make the corneal epithelium slough off just like your skin peels after a sunburn.

5. Ommatophobia is the fear of eyes.

6. You blink on average about 15 to 20 times per minute. That blink rate may decrease by 50% when you are doing a visually demanding task like reading or working on a computer – and that’s one reason those tasks can lead to more dry-eye symptoms.

7. Your retinas see the world upside down, but your brain flips the image around for you.

8. If you are farsighted (hyperopia) your eye is short, and if you are shortsighted (myopia) your eye is long.

9. An eyelash has a lifespan of about 5 months. If an eyelash falls out it takes about 6 weeks to fully grow back.

10. All blue-eyed people are related. The first person with blue eyes was thought to have lived 6,000 to 10,000 years ago. All people before that had brown eyes.

11. One in every 12 males has some degree of “color blindness.”

 

 

Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D.

This blog provides general information and discussion about eye health and related subjects. The words and other content provided on this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately licensed physician. The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

Despite requests that patients bring their current glasses to their office visit, many show up without them.  Sometimes it’s an oversight, sometimes it is unavoidablesuch as "I lost them”, but frequently it’s intentional. There can be a perception that if patients don’t like their current glasses or feel like they are not working well for them they are better off starting from scratch. “Why would I want Dr. Potter to utilize a pair of glasses I’m not happy with as a basis or starting point for my next pair of glasses?”

But bringing your glasses to an appointment is important.

There are two main reasons for Dr. Potter to know what your last pair of glasses were, especially if they were purchased outside Potter Eye Care.

The first is to see what type of glasses they are and how you see out of them. Are they just distance? Just reading? A bifocal? A trifocal? A progressive?

Even if you feel they aren’t working for you it is important for Dr. Potter to know the type of lens you had previously and it is also important to know how you see out of them and what the previous prescription was. This can help to determine how new prescription compares to how you see out of the old one.

The second reason Dr. Potter likes to know what was in your last pair of glasses is that the majority of people who wear eyeglasses have some degree of astigmatism in their eyeglass prescription.

A significant change in either the amount or axis of the astigmatism correction from one pair of glasses to the next is often not tolerated well, especially in adults. If you make too big of a change from the previous prescription many people experience a pulling sensation in their eyes when they wear the new glasses. It can cause symptoms of eye strain, headaches and can often make flat objects like a table look like they are slanted.

Many of the problems that occur when giving someone a new eyeglass prescription without the benefit of knowing what the last pair of glasses were could be avoided if Dr. Potter knew the last prescription and how you see out of them.

And those are the reason we ask that you bring your current glasses with you when you come to see Dr. Potter for your vision exam!

 

Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D.

This blog provides general information and discussion about eye health and related subjects. The words and other content provided on this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately licensed physician. The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

Boo!

Halloween bringing lots of fun; dressing up, trick or treating, haunted houses....

But did you know that some Halloween practices can have some scarey results?

Halloween contacts are wildly fun with everything to monster eyes, goblin eyes, cat eyes, sci-fi or a glamour look. If properly fit by Dr. Potter or another eye care professional, they can be just the added touch you need for that perfect costume. However, taking the chance of permanently damaging your eyes and vision is a frightening prossibility that could last long after the last Halloween candy is eaten.  Some people do not realize that the FDA classifies contact lenses as a medical device that can alter cells of the eye and that damage can occur if they are not fit properly.  Problems such as infection, redness, corneal ulcers, hypoxia (lack of oxygen to the eye) and permanent blindness can occur if the proper fit is not ensured. 

Another concern that ICE, FTC, and FDA have are the illegal black market contacts that come into the country unchecked. Proper safety regulations are strictly adhered to by conventional contact lens companies to insure that the contact lenses are sterile and packaged properly and accurately.

Health concerns arise whenever black market, unregulated contacts come into the US market and are sold at flea markets, thrift shops, beauty shops, malls, convenient stores and the likes. These are sold without a prescribers prescription, and are illegal in the US. Buyer beware - these contacts cause concern. You don’t want to bargain shop on parachutes OR your eyes! There have also been reports of damage to eyes because Halloween Spook houses ask employees to share between shifts the same pair of Halloween contact lenses as they dress up for their costume.

So the take-home message is; we don't want to spook you and we hope you have a great time at Halloween, enjoying the flare that decorative contacts can bring to your costume, but get them from a reputable venue and be fit by Dr. Potter or another eye care professional with a proper legal prescription. 

Call Potter Eye Care to schedule your eye health and vision consultation!

 

The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ

The Background

Over the last several years, research has indicated a strong correlation between the presence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and glaucoma. Information from some of these pivotal studies is presented below.

Did you know

  • Glaucoma affects over 60 million people worldwide and almost 3 million people in the U.S.
  • There are many people who have glaucoma but have not yet had it diagnosed.
  • Glaucoma is the second-leading cause of blindness in the U.S. behind macular degeneration.
  • If glaucoma is not detected and goes untreated, it will result in peripheral vision loss and eventual, irreversible blindness.

 

  • Sleep apnea is a condition that obstructs breathing during sleep.
  • It affects 100 million people around the globe and around 25 million people in the U.S.
  • A blocked airway can cause loud snoring, gasping or choking because breathing stops for up to two minutes.
  • Poor sleep due to sleep apnea results in morning headaches and chronic daytime sleepiness.

The Studies

In January 2016, a meta-analysis by Liu et. al., reviewed studies that collectively encompassed 2,288,701 individuals over six studies. Review of the data showed that if an individual has OSA there is an increased risk of glaucoma that ranged anywhere from 21% to 450% depending on the study.

Later in 2016, a study by Shinmei et al. measured the intraocular pressure in subjects with OSA while they slept and had episodes of apnea. Somewhat surprisingly they found that when the subjects were demonstrating apnea during sleep, their eye pressures were actually lower during those events than when the events were not happening.

This does not mean there is no correlation between sleep apnea and glaucoma - it just means that an increase in intraocular pressure is not the causal reason for this link. It is much more likely that the correlation is caused by a decrease in the oxygenation level (which happens when you stop breathing) in and around the optic nerve.

In September of 2016, Chaitanya et al. produced an exhaustive review of all the studies done to date regarding a connection between obstructive sleep apnea and glaucoma and came to a similar conclusion. The risk for glaucoma in someone with sleep apnea could be as high as 10 times normal. They also concluded that the mechanism of that increased risk is most likely hypoxia – or oxygen deficiency - to the optic nerve.

The Conclusion

There seems to be a definite correlation of having obstructive sleep apnea and a significantly increased risk of getting glaucoma. That risk could be as high as 10 times the normal rate.

In the end, it would extremely wise if you have been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea to have a comprehensive eye exam in order to detect your potential risk for glaucoma.

 

Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D.

This blog provides general information and discussion about eye health and related subjects. The words and other content provided on this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately licensed physician. The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

Are you thinking about starting to wear contact lenses or switching to a different type of contact?

Wearing contacts can make a big difference in the way you see things – such as sharper details and brighter colors. And technology has made contacts more comfortable than ever.

While we look forward to discussing contact lenses and working closely with you to find the right type of lens to meet your needs, here are some things for you to think about:

Reasons to consider contact lenses

  • Contact lenses move with your eye, allow a natural field of view, have no frames to obstruct your vision and greatly reduce distortions.
  • Unlike glasses, they do not fog up or get water spots.
  • Contact lenses are excellent for sports and other physical activities.
  • Many people feel they look better in contact lenses.
  • Compared to eyeglasses, contacts may offer better, more natural sight.

Some things to remember about contact lenses

  • Compared to glasses, contact lenses require a longer initial examination and more follow-up visits to maintain eye health. Lens care also requires more time.
  • If you are going to wear your lenses successfully, you will have to clean and store them properly, adhere to lens-wearing schedules and make appointments for follow-up care.
  • If you are wearing disposable or planned replacement lenses, you will have to carefully follow the schedule for disposing the used lenses and using new ones.

Contact lens types

There are two general types of contact lenses: hard and soft.

Rigid gas-permeable (RGP):

The hard lenses most commonly used today are rigid gas-permeable lenses (RGP). They are made of materials that are designed for their optical and comfort qualities. Hard lenses hold their shape, yet allow the free flow of oxygen through the lenses to the cornea of your eye. 

RGPs provide excellent vision, have a short initial adaptation period, and are easy to care for. RGPs are comfortable to wear, have a relatively long life, and correct most vision problems.

The disadvantages are that RGPs require consistent wear to maintain how comfortable they feel, and can occasionally slip off-center of the eye.

Soft contact lenses:

Soft lenses are the choice of most contact wearers. These lenses are comfortable and come in many versions, depending on how you want to wear them.

Disposable-wear lenses are removed nightly and replaced on a daily, weekly, biweekly, or monthly basis and are easy to get used to wearing.

Daily-wear contacts do not need to be cleaned and are great for active lifestyles but don't correct all vision problems and vision may not be as sharp as with RGP lenses. 

Extended-wear soft contacts can usually be worn up to seven days without removal. Be sure to ask us about extended-wear contacts and a possible greater risk of eye infections. 

Colored soft contacts change your eye color, the appearance of your eye, or both. They are available by prescription and should only be worn after an eye exam and fitting by an eye-care professional. Over-the-counter colored contacts are illegal in some states and pose a serious danger to your eye health.

Bifocal or multifocal

Bifocal or multifocal contact lenses are available in both soft and RPG varieties. They can correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism in combination with presbyopia. Visual quality is often not as good as with single vision lenses; however, for some people the ability to correct presbyopia is worth it.

Contacts are a great fit for many patients but don't forget to be prepared

Carry a backup pair of glasses with a current prescription—just in case you have to take out your contacts. Contacts can make your eyes more light-sensitive, so don't forget to wear sunglasses with UV protection and a wide-brim hat when you’re in the sun.

Hygiene is the most critical aspect to successfully wearing contacts

When cared for properly, contact lenses can provide a comfortable and convenient way to work, play, and live the millions of people who wear them. While contact lenses are usually a safe and effective form of vision correction, they are not entirely risk-free. 

Contact lenses are medical devices, and failure to wear, clean, and store them as directed can increase the risk of eye infections. Not following your eye doctor’s directions raises the risk of developing serious infections. Your habits, supplies, and eye doctor are all essential to keeping your eyes healthy. 

We’re here to help

If you are interested in wearing contact lenses, we will provide you with a thorough eye examination and an evaluation of your suitability for contact lens wear. Contact us today for more information about contact lenses and to schedule a contact-fitting exam. We’ll discuss the best options for your visual and lifestyle needs.

 

This blog provides general information and discussion about eye health and related subjects. The words and other content provided in this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately licensed physician. The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

Choosing a new pair of eyeglasses can be a daunting task.

Making a decision on what style glasses you will be wearing for the next year until your vision is checked again can be stressful. This is one of the many reasons opticians are here for you. In many ways, this may be the most important task for the optician, because keeping you happy motivates you to wear your glasses daily.

Most people’s reaction is to play it safe with new glasses and stick with something relatively similar to what they are currently wearing.

While not necessarily a bad decision, this isn’t something opticians try to promote. Opticians often spend time meeting with frame representatives and browsing the Internet to keep up with the ever-changing trends in the world of eyeglass frames. And it’s a great feeling to successfully “update” your image with a new set of frames. Many patients are amazed at the difference a well-fit and -styled pair of glasses makes on their overall look.

There are many simple tips and tricks to consider when starting to browse for your next pair of frames.

The goal of this article is to improve your starting point when beginning to choose frames. That way, once the optician gets involved, the process is already well under way. Keep in mind that these are guidelines and “outside the box” thinking can be good as long as it fits within the required parameters of your prescription.

The first step is successfully identifying what face shape category you seem to fit into.

This image shows the most common face-shape categories. These are a great guidelines to help decide which frames will most likely appear to fit the best.

Oval - Oval faces are considered to be the “most versatile” because most frame styles and sizes fit well on this face type. As a general rule, and especially for oval faces, avoid choosing frames that extend past the widest part of your face. Stick with moderate-sized frames.

Upside Down Triangle - To even out the proportions of this face shape, choosing semi-rimless frames is always a positive. Less attention to the bottom half of the frame helps enhance the natural curves of this face shape. Frames that stay wide at the bottom and do not taper inward will also help even out this face.

Oblong - Being longer than it is wide, this face shape enjoys having larger frames on it. A lower bridge will help shorten the nose, and solid dark colors are a positive as well.

Square - A strong jaw line is the focus of this face shape, so to work with that, choosing smaller, narrow frames is a positive. Ovals and rounds work better than squares.

Diamond - Broad cheekbones are the focal point of this face shape. Being quite rare, the best style of frames to put on these faces are in the cat eye family. Following the face’s contours, flare-top frames, semi-rimless frames, and fun colors tend to work well with this shape.

Round - Rectangular frames work best on round faces. Wide bridges help separate the eyes and bring symmetry to the face. Make sure the frames are wider than they are deep.

Triangle - Cat eye frames work exceptionally well with this face shape also. Frames that have a lot of style and accents to the upper part of the frames and temples are a plus as this brings attention to the naturally narrow forehead.

Along with shapes and styles, some believe that certain colors work best with certain faces.

All people are considered to have either cool (blue) or warm (yellow) skin tones. Some people feel customers should stick within their family of coloring. Again this is only a recommendation since you should wear what you like. This is just strictly a guideline for those struggling to choose a frame for themselves. Based on experience, eye color can make a difference as well. People with lighter eyes tend to prefer lighter frame colors, and vice versa for people with darker eyes. Also, hair color can be considered. Patients with lighter or grey hair tend to shy away from darker frames unless looking to make a statement.

At the end of the day you have to choose what is most comfortable for you. Opticians’ suggestions and educated opinions can help steer you in the right direction. There is much to consider, but always keep in mind that comfort and functionality are the priorities.

Some people believe plastic or zyl frames are more comfortable than metal or semi-rimless. Having nose pads, metal frames feel “heavy” to some. Others cannot wear plastic due to oily skin. Plastic frames may slide as the day progresses so metal may be better suited.

Don’t be overwhelmed. Follow some simple guidelines, and remember to enjoy the process. There are infinite styles and options to get you seeing well and looking great. And while you’re considering lenses for your regular lenses, don’t forget to look for sunglasses frames!

 

Article contributed by Richard Striffolino Jr.

This blog provides general information and discussion about eye health and related subjects. The words and other content provided in this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately licensed physician. The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

Sunglasses are more than just a fashion statement - they’re important protection from the hazards of UV light.

If you wear are sunglasses mostly for fashion that’s great, just make sure the lenses block UVA and UVB rays.

And if you don’t wear sunglasses, it’s time to start.

Here are your top 6 reasons for wearing sunglasses:

Preventing Skin Cancer

The strongest evidence that sunglasses provide a medical benefit is in preventing skin cancer on your eyelids. UV light exposure from the sun is one of the strongest risk factors for the development of skin cancers.  

Each year there are more new cases of skin cancer than the combined incidence of cancers of the breast, prostate, lung and colon.

About 90 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers are associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun.

Your eyelids, especially the lower eyelids, are also susceptible to UV light and they do develop skin cancers somewhat frequently.

Many people who now regularly apply sunscreen to help protect them from UV light often don’t get that sunscreen up to the edge of their eyelids because they know the sunscreen is going to make their eyes sting and burn. Unfortunately, that leaves the eyelids unprotected. You can fix that by wearing sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays.

Decreasing Risk For Eye Disease

There is mounting evidence that lifetime exposure to UV light without protection can increase your risk of cataracts and macular degeneration. It also increases your risk of getting growths on the surface of your eye called Pinguecula and Pterygiums.  Besides looking unsightly they can interfere with your vision and require surgery to remove them. All of those problems are better off with prevention than treatment.

Preventing Snow Blindness

The snow reflects UV light and the exposure can be intense enough on a sunny day to cause a burn on your cornea like what happens when people are exposed to a bright welding arc.

Protection From Wind, Dust, Sand

Many times, when you are spending time outdoors and it is windy, you risk particles blowing in the wind getting into your eyes. Sunglasses help protect you from that exposure. The wind itself can also make your tears evaporate more quickly and cause the surface of your eye to dry and become irritated and then cause the eye to tear again.

Decreasing Headaches

People can get headaches if they are very light sensitive and don’t protect their eyes from bright sunlight. You can also bring on a muscle tension headache if you are constantly squinting because the sunlight is too bright.

Clearer Vision When Driving

We have all experienced an episode of driving, coming around a turn and going directly into the direction of the setting or rising sun that causes our vision to be significantly impaired. Having sunglasses on whenever you are driving in sunlight helps prevent those instances. Just a general reduction in the glare and reflections that sunlight causes will make you a better and more comfortable driver.

So it’s time to go out there and find yourself a good pair of sunglasses that you look great in, and that protect your health too.

Your eye-care professional can help recommend sunglasses that are right for your needs.

Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D.

This blog provides general information and discussion about eye health and related subjects. The words and other content provided in this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately licensed physician. The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

Maui Jim - Like You Have Never Seen

News / Promotions

Announcing HDVision System
               HDVision System
7 Tips For Getting The Most Out Of Your...
The eye holds a unique place in medicine. Your eye doctor can see almost every part of your ey...

Reviews

Eye News